Hogs are a source of high quality animal protein in the form of common meat products such as ham, pork chops, pork sausage and bacon. By-products from hogs play a vital role in maintaining the quality of human life. For example, insulin from hogs is used to treat human diabetes; heart valves are used to replace damaged human heart valves; and hog skin is used to treat severe burn victims.

Missouri is the 6th largest hog-producing state in the nation with an inventory of three million hogs and pigs. Missouri Agriculture Statistics Service can provide further information on Missouri’s swine inventory.

Pseudorabies

Pseudorabies (PRV), also known as Aujeszky’s disease, is a swine disease that can also affect cattle, horses, dogs, cats, sheep and goats. The disease is caused by an extremely contagious herpes virus that causes reproductive problems, including abortion, and stillbirths, and even occasional deaths in breeding and finishing hogs.

In 1989, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) developed guidelines for the National Pseudorabies Eradication Program to eradicate pseudorabies from the United States. The program consists of five levels, Stage I, II, III, IV and V, with V being pseudorabies free. Every state must complete the requirements of each stage and apply annually for advancement in the program. Missouri has been recognized as pseudorabies free since May 1999, thanks to the cooperation and support of Missouri’s swine producers and industry leaders.

Uniform methods and rules for establishing and maintaining qualified pseudorabies-free swine herds as recommended by the Missouri Department of Agriculture and the United States Department of Agriculture are as follows:

Establishing a Qualified Pseudorabies - Negative (QN) Breeding Herd

Qualification is granted on the basis of one (1) complete herd test of all breeding animals, six (6) months of age and older, plus a number of progeny equal to 20% of the breeding swine population of the herd and finding all swine negative. Progeny shall be randomly selected from the oldest swine in the herd less a six (6) months of age.

Maintaining Qualified Pseudorabies - Negative (QN) Herd Status

  1. Qualification may be maintained by testing 20% of the swine over six (6) months of age or older and a number of offspring (4 to 6 months of age) equal to 6% of the breeding animals in the herd every 80-105 days and finding all swine negative.
  2. Qualification may be maintained by testing 7% of the swine over six (6) months of age and older and a number of the offspring (4 to 6 months of age) equal to 2% of the breeding animals in the herd every 25-35 days and finding all swine negative.

No swine may be tested twice in one (1) year to comply with the 20% requirement nor twice in 10 months to comply with the 7% requirement.

Additions to Qualified Pseudorabies - Negative (QN) Herd

  1. Movement between QN herds do not require an official pseudorabies test.
  2. Movement of breeding swine from a non-QN herd must be negative to an official pseudorabies serologic test not more than 30 days prior to movement. These animals must be isolated and retested at least 30 day and no later than 60 days after movement.
  3. Swine intended to be added to a QN herd from another QN herd, but with interim contact with swine other than those from a QN herd, shall be isolated until they have been found negative to an official pseudorabies serologic test conducted 30 days or more after the swine have been placed in isolation.

Swine Brucellosis

Swine brucellosis is an infectious disease caused by the Brucella bacteria. Like the National Pseudorabies Eradication Program, USDA has established guidelines for a Swine Brucellosis Control/ Eradication Program. The brucellosis program has three (3) stages that each state must complete before achieving brucellosis free status. Missouri was declared free of swine brucellosis in 1992.

Uniform methods and rules for establishing and maintaining validated-brucellosis free swine herds as recommended by the Missouri Department of Agriculture and the United States Department of Agriculture are as follows:

Herd Validation

Validation is granted on the basis of one complete herd test of all breeding animals six (6) months of age and older and finding all swine negative.

Maintaining Herd Validation

  1. Validation is good for a maximum of 12 months without further testing. At the end of this time, the herd must be revalidated. There is no grace period.
  2. Validation may be maintained by testing 20% of the swine over six (6) months of age and older and a number of the offspring (4 to 6 months of age) equal to 6% of the breeding animals in the herd every 80-105 days and finding all swine to be tested negative.
  3. Validation may be maintained by testing 7% of the swine over six (6) months of age or older and a number of offspring (5 to 6 months of age) equal to 2% of the breeding animals in the herd every 25-35 days and finding all swine negative.

No swine may be tested twice in one (1) year to comply with the 20% requirement nor twice in 10 months to comply with the 7% requirement.

Movement of Swine into Validated Herds

  1. Movement between validated-brucellosis free herds does not require an official brucellosis test.
  2. Movement of breeding swine from a non-validated brucellosis free herd requires one negative test within 30 days prior to movement. These animals must be isolated and retested 30-60 days after arrival.
  3. Breeding swine are not permitted to enter validated-brucellosis free herds from feedlots or slaughter consignments.
  4. Use of swine semen in swine brucellosis-free herds must come from boars in validated-brucellosis free herds.

For further information on the qualified or validated programs, please contact the Division of Animal Health at (573) 751-4260.

For information on import or exhibition regulations, contact the Division of Animal Health at (573) 751-4359.

Also, the USDA maintains a 24-hour toll-free telephone service that provides general import requirements for all states. Use a touch-tone telephone to contact the Voice Response System at (800) 545-8732.