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A note from Dr. Strubberg

In an effort to help protect Missouri’s cattle industry, the Department of Agriculture has current fiscal year funding for Trichomoniasis testing. The testing must go through the MDA Springfield Diagnostic Laboratory or the University of Missouri Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory in order to be considered for reimbursement. The animals are required to have official ID and samples must be submitted by an accredited veterinarian. Producers will be reimbursed at $50.00 per test for bulls over twelve months of age. The reimbursement process will work like this:

  1. The veterinarian will submit an invoice to the Producer like normal and the veterinary clinic will pay the laboratory invoice like normal. The Producer must pay the invoice to the veterinary clinic before reimbursement from the Department of Agriculture.
  2. Producers may submit their paid invoices by email to grant.lea@mda.mo.gov or by mail to our office at MO Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Animal Health, P. O. Box 630, Jefferson City, MO 65102.
  3. All bulls must reside in Missouri.
  4. Pooled samples are not accepted, they must be individual tests.
  5. All requests for payment must be received by June 15, 2022. The program may end sooner if funds are exhausted.

Please refer Producers with reimbursement questions to our Animal Health office at 573-751-3377. If you have specific questions regarding testing, contact the MDA Springfield Diagnostic Laboratory at 417-895-6861. MDA will charge a fee of $20.00 per Trichomoniasis test and media pouches are an additional $7.50 each.

The Missouri Department of Agriculture has funding available to provide reimbursement for testing of two different brucella species. This funding is available for a limited time until June 30, 2022 or until funds run out, whichever comes first.

Brucella canis

Canine brucellosis is a reproductive disease of dogs caused by the intracellular bacterium Brucella canis (B. canis). It is in the family that causes brucellosis in other species, such as B. abortus in cattle, B. suis in swine, and B. melitensis in sheep and goats.

Symptoms in dogs may include infertility, abortion, stillbirth, decreased litter size, decreased puppy survivability, swollen lymph glands, eye disease, infection or arthritis of the spine, abnormalities of the sperm or male reproductive organs, and weight loss.

Infected females may raise an apparently normal litter. Puppies may become infected in utero and remain asymptomatic until years later.

Symptoms in people may include fever, night sweats, headaches, back pain, arthritis, fatigue, and weight loss.

For a limited time, breeders will be reimbursed $20 per Brucella canis test for each eligible dog. All canines 6 months of age or older are eligible for testing. The MDA reimbursement program is only available at the Springfield or Jefferson City MDA Animal Health Laboratories.

If you're interested or have questions, contact the Animal Care Program at (573) 751-3076.

To request Brucella canis brochures, please contact our Animal Health office at 573-751-3377.

Brucella ovis

The Department of Agriculture has been allocated funding for Brucella ovis testing. The testing must go through the MDA Springfield Diagnostic Laboratory in order to be considered for reimbursement. The samples will be serum specific, the animals are required to have official ID most commonly Scrapie ID and samples must be submitted by an accredited veterinarian. Producers will be reimbursed at $50.00 per ram over six months of age. The reimbursement process will work like this:

  1. The veterinarian will submit an invoice to the Producer like normal and the veterinarian office will pay the MDA Springfield Diagnostic Laboratory invoice like normal. The Producer must pay the invoice to the veterinary clinic before reimbursement from the Department of Agriculture.
  2. Producers may submit their paid invoices by email to grant.lea@mda.mo.gov or by mail to our office at MO Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Animal Health, 1616 Missouri Blvd., Jefferson City, MO 65109.

Please refer Producers with reimbursement questions to our Animal Health office at 573-751-3377. If you have specific testing questions feel free to contact the MDA Springfield Diagnostic Laboratory at 417-895-6861. The lab will charge a fee of $10.00 per Brucella ovis test performed.

To request Brucella ovis brochures please contact our Animal Health office at 573-751-3377.

Veterinary Resources

Swine Barn

Livestock Import Requirements & Entry Permits
Review import regulations and 24-hour access to online permitting.

Semi Trailer

Health Certificate Resources
CVI options for Missouri Veterinarians

Animal Diagnostic Lab

Animal Diagnostic Labs
Laboratories offer a variety of diagnostic services. Please contact your nearest laboratory for more information.

Emerging Issues

Avian Influenza

Avian influenza (AI) is caused by an influenza type A virus which can infect poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, domestic ducks, geese, and guinea fowl) and wild birds (especially waterfowl).

AI viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or “H” proteins, of which there are 16 (H1–H16), and neuraminidase or “N” proteins, of which there are 9 (N1–N9). AI viruses are further classified by their pathogenicity—the ability of a particular virus strain to produce disease in domestic chickens.

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) is a serious disease and requires rapid response because it is highly contagious and often fatal to chickens. The goal is to quickly contain and eradicate the disease, protecting our poultry industry, and in turn, the American consumer.

Due to the Avian Influenza response, please submit a permit request form in order to move poultry.

Low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) viruses typically cause little or no clinical signs in infected poultry. The LPAI virus is excreted through infected birds’ feces and respiratory secretions. It spreads primarily through direct contact between healthy and infected birds. It can also be spread through indirect contact with contaminated equipment and materials. Low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus strains occur naturally in wild migratory waterfowl and shorebirds without causing illness.

Biosecurity is key in prevention of avian influenza.

Here are a few biosecurity steps that can be implemented when working with birds or owning your own birds:

  • Minimum PPE such as eye protection, gloves, and disposable boot covers or rubber boots that can be disinfected should be worn when working with possibly diseased livestock or poultry. Coveralls and masks are recommended.
  • Don’t haul disease home. Keep work clothes and shoes separate for home clothes and shoes. If working with sick birds on location, clean and disinfect the vehicle and equipment used on that premises before going to another premises or home.
  • Keep it clean-wash hands before and after handling poultry, clean and disinfect equipment and shoes before visiting another place or before working with your own livestock and poultry.

For a full list of reportable diseases, visit our webpage.